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MMEDIA 2A06 Design And Code

Academic Year: Fall 2017

Term: Fall

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Dr. David Harris Smith

Email: dhsmith@mcmaster.ca

Office: Togo Salmon Hall 303

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23248

Website:

Office Hours: Thursdays 11:00 am–12:00 pm, or by appointment



Course Objectives:

Design + Code is an active learning course, where students become familiar with the key components of design process in the field of multimedia by defining problems, getting ideas, and creating form using digital media toolsets. Students work in group and individual settings to investigate, discuss and design proposals intended to satisfy challenges posed in the weekly course meetings. This lecture/studio course offers multimedia students a chance to explore critical perspectives in design and digital media technologies, and to develop practical knowledge of code and design using a problem-based learning approach. Weekly questions, themes, readings, examples, and demonstrations will be used to anchor the theory of multimedia practice, building on an incremental exploration of the fundamentals of design and coding.

Students will develop conceptual frameworks for questioning and exploring the interplay of culture, design and technology, and subsequently, they will develop pathways linking these critical reflections to the practices of multimedia arts. Students will learn the basic concepts of coding and design relevant to a wide range of interactive multimedia works. Students will gain practical experience in software programs Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, HTML 5, CSS, Processing and P5.js.

Tutorial modules will support the completion of multimedia assignments through assignment-related exercises that incorporate digital tools and techniques for media authoring, manipulation, and composition.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Readings will be posted as PDF documents to the course website. These readings are essential for the development of conceptual framework objectives in the course and reading response evaluations comprise 20% of the final grade.


Method of Assessment:

  • 20% Participation: Assessed through your informed contributions to lecture and tutorial discussions, completion of tutorial exercises, and lecture and tutorial attendance.
  • 20% Reading Mind Maps Assignment: Students will read and annotate assigned readings. Students will use their annotations to develop and post a 400-word written synopsis of the reading before the beginning of the following weekly lecture. Student groups will then discuss, revise, and post a reading synopsis mind map in an active learning session in class.
  • 20% Multimedia Assignment 1. INFOGRAPHIC POSTER: A graphic design project that demonstrates the application of design principles and digital media production skills to content derived from scholarly knowledge search and curation. DUE SEP 28
  • 20% Multimedia Assignment 2. DESIGN WEBSITE: A multi-page website that applies web coding production skills to the presentation of an original design kit. DUE OCT 26
  • 20% Multimedia Assignment 3. GENERATIVE ART: A Processing sketch that demonstrates a dynamic interactive aesthetic effect, primarily through code. DUE NOV 30


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

All assignments are due on the due date provided. Any submission after that date will mean that the assignment is late. However, assignments will be accepted after the due date for up to one week without any penalty. No assignments will be accepted later than one week. You should do everything in your power to get your assignment in by the due date; the one-week grace period is to allow you to complete your assignments should you have minor medical situations or family issues. Please note that MSAF is for a maximum period of three days, and can only be used for the assignment’s due date, so even if you submit an MSAF, you will not get additional time beyond the one week grace period.


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

Week 1: SEP 7

  • INTRODUCTING OURSELVES AND THE COURSE
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE: What is a design fail and how do we know it? Post examples with explanations to course website.
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE: How to write a synopsis or summary of a reading? What method would you use to find and record the needed information while you read? How to best structure the synopsis?
  • READING ASSIGNMENT 1: Read and post synopsis on Frascara, J. (1988). Graphic design: Fine art or social science?. Design issues, 5(1), 18-29.
  • LAB in MULTIMEDIA WING:
    • Intro to Multimedia Wing
    • Vector Graphics.

Week 2: SEP 14

  • MIND MAPPING THE READING: Group whiteboard mind map of Frascara (1988).
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE: Why do humans design stuff? Is design linked to human nature?
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE: DESIGN + CODE GLOSSARY: Part 1: What are the fundamentals of design? Part 2: Groups are assigned to present specific design principles using one historic and one contemporary artwork. Group posting of design terminology definitions with illustrations to course glossary.
  • READING ASSIGNMENT 2: Engholm, I. (2002). Digital style history: the development of graphic design on the Internet. Digital Creativity, 13(4), 193-211.
  • TUTORIALS and LAB in MULTIMEDIA WING:
    • Vector Graphics 3. Raster Image 1. InDesign
    • Multimedia Assignment 1: Infographic Poster. Students will work within a 6-person team to develop the ‘story’ of the Internet. (Give your team a name and exchange contact information!) Each team will brainstorm, research facts, distill and structure information to build their team’s story elements. Team members will support each other in design and layout ideas but EACH team member will submit their own unique information graphic representing the story. DUE OCT 5

Week 3: SEP 21

  • MIND MAPPING THE READING: Group whiteboard mind map of Engholm (2002).
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE: Freytag’s Pyramid and the Rocky Horror Picture Show. 
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE: Part 1: Defining problems: Issue Brainstorming: What story or issue to tell about the Internet? Focus Group Exercise. Part 2: Getting Ideas: Visual Brainstorming: What images, figures, symbols are associated with your issue?
  • READING ASSIGNMENT: Hawkes, R. (2011). Introducing HTML5. Foundation HTML5 Canvas: For Games and Entertainment. Apress. Pp. 1–22.
  • TUTORIALS and LAB in MULTIMEDIA WING:
    • Raster Image 2, InDesign,
    • Active Learning Groups on Multimedia Assignment 1

Week 4: SEP 28

  • BAUHAUS Screening and Group Discussion: Design genealogies: From Bauhaus to your house, how do Bauhaus design theories show up in your life? Show examples. What is another historic design movement and how does it show up in your daily interactions?
  • MIND MAPPING THE READING: Group whiteboard mind map of Hawkes (2011).
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE 6: Getting Ideas: Part 1: Forced connections. Part 2: Action Verbs.
  • READING ASSIGNMENT 4: Ehn, P. (1998). Manifesto for a digital Bauhaus 1. Digital Creativity, 9(4), 207-217.
  • DUE: Multimedia Assignment 1. INFOGRAPHIC POSTER
  • Multimedia Assignment 2. DESIGN WEBSITE: A multi-page website that applies web coding production skills to the presentation of an original design kit. DUE OCT 26
  • TUTORIALS and LAB in MULTIMEDIA WING:
    • InDesign, HTML5 I
    • Autonomous Active Learning Groups on Multimedia Assignment 1

Week 5 OCT 5

  • MIND MAPPING THE READING: Group whiteboard mind map of Ehn (1998).
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE : Hyperlink and information architecture.
  • READING ASSIGNMENT 1: Read and post synopsis on McLuhan, M. (1994). The Medium is the Message. Understanding media: The extensions of man. MIT press.
  • TUTORIALS and LAB in MULTIMEDIA WING:
    • HTML5 and CSS
    • Assignments Workshop.

 

MIDTERM RECESS

 

Week 6 OCT 19

  • MIND MAPPING THE READING: Group whiteboard mind map of McLuhan (1994).
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE:  Write a program that features the key components of a computer program that doesn’t use a computing machine.
  • TUTORIAL:
    • HTML5 and CSS
    • Projects Intensive
  • READING ASSIGNMENT 4: Read and post synopsis on Wolfram, S. (2006). How Do Simple Programs Behave? In M. Silvers (Ed.), Programming Cultures. Architectural Design, July/August 2006. pp. 34–37.
  • TUTORIALS and LAB in MULTIMEDIA WING:
    • Processing
    • Assignments workshop.

Week 7 OCT 26

  • MIND MAPPING THE READING: Group whiteboard mind map of Wolfram (2006).
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE: Write a program that features the key components of a computer program that doesn’t use a computing machine. A Post-it emergent art coding project.
  • READING ASSIGNMENT 5: Read and post synopsis on Reas, C. (2006). Process/drawing. In M. Silvers (Ed.), Programming Cultures. Architectural Design, July/August 2006. Pp. 26–33.
  • DUE Multimedia Assignment 2. DESIGN WEBSITE
  • Multimedia Assignment 3. GENERATIVE ART: A Processing sketch that demonstrates a dynamic interactive aesthetic effect, primarily through code. DUE NOV 30
  • TUTORIALS and LAB in MULTIMEDIA WING:
    • Processing
    • Interactivity

Week 8 NOV 2

  • MIND MAPPING THE READING: Group whiteboard mind map of Reas (2006).
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE 9: BLACK BOX interactive processing.
  • READING ASSIGNMENT 4: Pearson, M. (2011). Introduction; Generative Art: In Theory and Practice. Generative art: A practical guide using Processing. Shelter Island, NY: Manning Publications.
  • TUTORIALS and LAB in MULTIMEDIA WING:
    • Processing
    • Interactivity

Week 9 NOV 9

  • MIND MAPPING THE READING: Group whiteboard mind map of Pearson, M. (2011).
  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE: Generative art interaction modeling
  • READING ASSIGNMENT 5: Read and post synopsis on Gleick, J. (2011). A Nervous System for the Earth. The information. New York: Pantheon Press. Pp. 125–167.
  • TUTORIALS and LAB in MULTIMEDIA WING:
    • Processing
    • Interactivity

Week 11 NOV 23

  • ACTIVE LEARNING CHALLENGE: What is the future history of present day design and media arts?
  • MIND MAPPING THE READING: Group whiteboard mind map of Gleick (2011).
  • TUTORIALS and LAB in MULTIMEDIA WING:
    • Processing
    • Interactivity

Week 12 NOV 30

  • CODE + DESIGN Presentation of final projects in Black Box. Multimedia Assignment 3 DUE.


Other Course Information:

TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR EQUIPMENT RESERVATION/BORROWING

In order to reserve and borrow equipment maintained for academic use by Humanities Media and Computing (HMC) for the Faculty of Humanities, it is necessary to read and accept the following Terms and Conditions.

  1. Students are responsible for the condition and possession of all equipment borrowed. In cases, where equipment is lost or damaged beyond repair, students are responsible for replacing the equipment within 14 days of the date on which the equipment was initially borrowed.
  2. In cases where equipment is to be replaced by a student, the replacement value of the equipment listed on this system will be the amount that must be provided in the form of cheque or money order made out to McMaster University and provided to HMC.
  3. In cases, where equipment needs to be replaced, borrowing privileges will be suspended until the replacement value of the equipment has been provided to HMC. Suspension of privileges will be ongoing and may traverse one or more academic sessions until such a time as the replacement value of the damaged or lost equipment has been duly provided.
  4. In cases, where equipment is returned to HMC in a damaged condition, HMC reserves the right to levy an amount equal to the cost of repair to the borrower.
  5. In cases, where equipment needs to be repaired, borrowing privileges will be suspended until the cost of the repair to the equipment has been provided to HMC. Suspension of privileges will be ongoing and may traverse one or more academic sessions until such a time as the cost to repair the damaged equipment has been duly provided.
  6. Equipment may be signed out overnight, and be returned by 10:00 a.m. the next working day.
  7. Equipment can be reserved every second day per person.
  8. Equipment signed out on Fridays must be returned on Mondays by 10:00 a.m.
  9. Camera batteries must be fully charged when returned.
  10. A student who fails to pick up equipment, or returns it late, may have their reservation/sign-out privileges revoked for a period of one week. This rule also applies to missing parts or returning a battery (or batteries) uncharged.
  11. A student who fails to return equipment on time will be required on their next sign-out (when their privileges have been restored) to provide a $20 cash deposit at the time of pick-up. Failure to return equipment on time thereafter will result in both a loss of deposit and a loss of privileges for the duration of the current academic session.
  12. Equipment can be reserved up to one week ahead.
  13. All students must be registered for key access to TSH-202B (A/V lab) before signing out any equipment.